KENT MEMORIAL LIBRARY FALL BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: KEEP CALM, CARRY ON? ENGLAND’S TWENTIETH CENTURY WARS

Press Release 8/16/17

(Kent, Connecticut) – The book discussion group at Kent Memorial Library for fall 2017 will take its cue from the movie “Dunkirk.” But it is impossible to understand the British experience of war without going back to England’s situation by the end of WWI.

World War I rewrote the map of Europe, as well as parts of Asia and Africa, and created the states that presently make up the Gulf region. While England was not affected by having its borders altered or its population moved like chess pieces, it was irrevocably changed. The secure calm of the Victorian era shattered; the horrors, recently honored on the battlefield at Passchendaele, were never far from people’s thoughts because the enormous losses touched everyone.

To understand this history, the first novel on the fall list takes place during and after WWI. From there, we move on to works set during and shortly after WWII.

It is recommended that participants read an article in the book section of last Sunday’s NYTimes: https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/02/books/review/what-does-a-poet-know-about-war.html

Although the article addresses the writing of poetry, some of the same issues the author raises apply to prose writing about war.

Thursday, September 14 Regeneration. 1991. by Pat Barker

Thursday, October 12 A God In Ruins. 2015. by Kate Atkinson

Thursday, November 9 The Welsh Girl. 2007. by Peter Davies

Thursday, December 14 The Clothes on Their Backs. 2008. by Linda Grant

The Kent Memorial Library Book Discussion Group meets once a month on Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 p.m. in the Reading Room. The meetings are free and open to the public, but please register at the circulation desk so our exceptionally capable librarians will know how many books to round up. Please call the Library to register at 860.927.3761.

Discussion is conducted by Betty Krasne, PhD, writer, professor emerita, and long time Kent resident. Betty Krasne, Ph.D., a writer and retired professor of literature who lives in Kent, leads the discussions.